How to remove paint and stains from an acrylic tub?

August 17, 2010 4:49PM
 
Acrylic bathtubs have very smooth surfaces, no pores, so any dirt and stains will be on the surface. That helps a lot.
 
The first question is how much paint? If it’s just a few small drops of paint, you may be able to pop most or all of it off with a fingernail. If there is a little left or the finish is scratched, then use a liquid polish like Gel-Gloss. If that doesn’t do it, then use 600 grid sandpaper, followed by the liquid polish.
 
What if someone cleaned the painting tools in there? Or took a tea bath? It turns out that bleaching the tub can be effective. Bleach does not hurt acrylic. Fill the tub with enough water to cover the stain and add ¼ cup bleach per gallon of water. Let it sit for a few hours.  
 
If that doesn’t get it all out, then use the 600 grid sandpaper and liquid polish.
 
Warning: Always, always, always test what you’re doing in an inconspicuous area and be aware that mixing bleach with other chemicals can be hazardous to your health.

The Danger of Chlorine Bleach

August 2, 2010 4:40PM
Chlorine Gas and other Toxic Vapors
What a thought. Mixing common household cleaners or other household products can produce a toxic gas. Whew. Better be careful.
 
Bleach + Ammonia = Not Healthy
 
Ammonia is found in window and glass cleaners, some latex paints and urine. Be careful cleaning the kitty litter box or a diaper pail!
 
Bleach + Acid = Chlorine Gas (Not Healthy)
 
Vinegar is an acid. Other common products with acids in them can include glass and window cleaners, automatic dishwashing detergents and rinses, toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, lime/calcium/rust removal products, and brick/concrete cleaners.
 
Bleach + Oven Cleaner or Hydrogen Peroxide or some Insecticides = Not Healthy
 
Bleach is in quite a few products, including the swimming pool.
 
Drain Cleaner + another Drain Cleaner = Not Healthy
 
The best thing is to
  • Read ingredient and warning labels on products.
  • Use products in the way they were designed to be used.
  • Don’t use one product right after the other.
 
The basic information for this article is thanks to the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services. More information about the chemical reaction and what it does to your health can be found there.
Does this really happen? Yes, it did in two California state hospitals in the late 1980’s. Psychiatric patients in two state hospitals were assisting the janitors. According to the report it was not supervised properly, bleach was mixed with an acid and chlorine gas was produced. In all cases there were medical issues, which generally were gone within 36 hours.
 
It’s scary to think that this was a hospital with lots of supervision around, yet the accidents still happened.
 
In the same article they mention that 409 cases of bleach + acid exposure were reported in 1990.

Which Finish is Best - Cast Iron, Fiberglass or Acrylic Bathtubs

06/21/2010 5:18 PM
What about the finish
Tub finishes last the longest if properly cared for. Keeping them clean and the sides waxed extends the life. Do not wax the floor. Be careful with hard objects around them, thus preventing accidental chipping and scratching. Avoid any abrasive cleaning products and use only mild soaps.
 
Repair materials are available for cast iron finishes. A drawback is matching the color and finish look. Refinishing the surface can be done, but it’s best to leave it to a professional with a very good reputation.
 
Acrylic coated fiberglass tubs can also be refinished and they have the same issue with color matching, primarily because the acrylic fiberglass colors fade over time.
 
Acrylic tubs have the color all the way through. This means that scratches can be sanded and buffed out.
 

Soaker Tub Weight - Cast Iron or Acrylic

6/18/2010 1:25 PM
Why weight is an issue
Add the weight of the bathtub, water and people and you could easily exceed the load rating of a wood framed floor. The weight would cause the floor to flex, causing damage to the tile and grout.. Many freestanding tubs have four feet, so that puts a lot of weight at each foot, creating deflection that would certainly damage tile.
 
An additional hazard comes in by not knowing the condition of the wood inside the floor. Was it properly installed? Has it had water damage?
 
Weight can be minimized by choice of materials, the size of the tub and the amount of water it holds.
 
Acrylic free standing bathtubs are about ¼ the weight of a cast iron tub, giving significant weight savings.

 

Acrylic vs. Cast Iron Tubs

6/16/2010 10:53 AM
 
Heat retention and heat loss
The bottom line is that cast iron is much better at conducting heat than acrylic is. This means that when cold it will feel colder than acrylic, and when hot it will cool the hot water in the tub much quicker.
 
For those serious bath takers who like to soak in a tub and relax or read, cast iron tubs will need more hot water to reach a comfortable temperature and keep it than acrylic will. If you’re switching from cast iron to acrylic, the surprise will be how much hotter the water is when first stepping in.
 
I just thought I would share my first experience with my acrylic tub, having grown up with cast iron.
I was so excited to finally have the tub (with jets) to bathe in, on my day off I filled it with water, the same way I have always done.
I started to ease in, it was very hot, I was a bit surprised, but managed to get all the way in. After about 5 minutes, I got light headed and had to get out!
Well, I was so accustomed to having to "heat" the cast iron, when filling the tub, that I made the bath too hot! I don't find that I have heat loss greater than the cast iron, and in fact, find I refill the tub with hot water less in the acrylic tub.

 

August 17, 2010 4:49PM
 
Acrylic bathtubs have very smooth surfaces, no pores, so any dirt and stains will be on the surface. That helps a lot.
 
The first question is how much paint? If it’s just a few small drops of paint, you may be able to pop most or all of it off with a fingernail. If there is a little left or the finish is scratched, then use a liquid polish like Gel-Gloss. If that doesn’t do it, then use 600 grid sandpaper, followed by the liquid polish.
 
What if someone cleaned the painting tools in there? Or took a tea bath? It turns out that bleaching the tub can be effective. Bleach does not hurt acrylic. Fill the tub with enough water to cover the stain and add ¼ cup bleach per gallon of water. Let it sit for a few hours.  
 
If that doesn’t get it all out, then use the 600 grid sandpaper and liquid polish.
 
Warning: Always, always, always test what you’re doing in an inconspicuous area and be aware that mixing bleach with other chemicals can be hazardous to your health.